Archive

Posts Tagged ‘the beast’

The Beast 666 on St. Augustine’s “Love, and do what thou wilt”

January 5, 2010 8 comments

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Here are two quotations, straight from the Beast’s mouth (or pen, specifically), regarding the similarity of the Law of Thelema to a statement made by St. Augustine.

The first quotation is taken from a letter written by The Beast 666 (Aleister Crowley) to Karl Germer in March 1942 (available in the  ‘Downloads’ section of LAShTAL.com):

“St. Augustine’s ‘Ama, et fac quod vis’ [roughly ‘Love, and do what thou wilt’] puts the cart before the horse, begs the question, and is moreover liable to the most serious misunderstandings. As if the fact of ‘loving’ were sufficient excuse for all and sundry acts, or lines of conduct.

Safer, ‘Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law’ with ‘love’ relegated to its scientifically correct position as the means of carrying out all plans soever: Hungry man ‘loves’ food and drink, i.e. unites chemically therewith, assimilates it to his own nature, and so becomes man refreshed i.e. capable of continuing to pursue his true will. Hence, ‘Love is the law, love under will.’

It will not help him to ‘love’ anything but food and drink on such occasions; and it must be the food suited to his nature and his powers of digestion. Hay will not restore or nourish him; and food too gross, or too plentiful, drink too cold or too intoxicating, may disturb the perfection of the process.

Of course you [Karl Germer] know all this well enough; but I thought that you might find it useful to quote St. August to the common blatant guffaw of the omnipresent blackguard ‘Do wot yer loike, eh? What ho!'”

This second quotation comes from an unfinished essay by To Mega Therion 666 called “Antecedents of Thelema“:

“It has been remarked by some critics of the Law of Thelema that the words “Do what thou wilt” are not original with the Master Therion: or, rather, with Aiwass, who uttered to the scribe Ankh-f-n-khonsu, the priest of the princes, The Book of the Law.

This is true enough, in its own way: we have, firstly, the word of St. Augustine: “Love, and do what thou wilt.”

This is however, as the context shows, by no means what is meant by The Book of the Law. St. Augustine’s thesis is that if the heart be full of Love, one cannot go wrong. It is, so to say, a rider upon the theorem of St. Paul’s thirteenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians…

Far more important is the Word of Rabelais, Fais ce que veulx [Fr. “Do what thou wilt”]. The sublime Doctor does indeed intend, so far as he goes, to set forth in essence the Law of Thelema, very much as it is understood by the Master Therion himself… Superb as is this adumbration of the Law of Thelema by Rabelais with his Word Fais ce que veulxThe Book of the Law gives us more—it gives us “all in the clear light…”

Love is the law, love under will.

Advertisements